What to feed your baby

From around 6 months

To start with, your baby only needs a small amount of solid food, once a day, at a time that suits you both.
You can start weaning with single vegetables and fruits – try blended, mashed, or soft-cooked sticks of a parsnip, broccoli, potato, yam, sweet potato, carrot, apple or pear. You could also try baby rice mixed with your baby's usual milk. Make sure any cooked food has cooled right down before offering it to your baby.
It's important to introduce foods that can trigger allergic reactions one at a time, in very small amounts, so that you can spot any reaction. These foods can be introduced from around 6 months as part of your baby's diet, just like any other foods:
cows’ milk
eggs (eggs without a red lion stamp should not be eaten raw or lightly cooked)
foods that contain gluten, including wheat, barley, and rye
nuts and peanuts (serve them crushed or ground)
seeds (serve them crushed or ground)
soya
shellfish (don’t serve raw or lightly cooked)
fish
Once introduced and if tolerated, keep offering those foods as part of your baby’s usual diet (to minimize the risk of allergy). Read more about food allergies and what signs to look out for.


Essential food groups

Include vegetables that aren't so sweet, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach – this will help your baby get used to a range of flavors (rather than just the sweeter ones like carrots and sweet potato). This can help prevent them from being fussy eaters as they grow up.
Remember, babies don’t need salt or sugar added to their food (or cooking water). Babies shouldn't eat salty foods as it isn't good for their kidneys and sugar can cause tooth decay.
These are the essential food groups — gradually increase the amount and variety your baby eats. Have a look at our baby weaning recipes for inspiration!


Vegetables

Cook to soften them, then mash or blend veggies to a suitable texture for your baby – or give them as finger foods. Offer a variety including ones with bitter flavors:
broccoli
parsnips
peppers
peas
cauliflower
swede
spinach
green beans
courgette
asparagus
kale
carrots
avocado
butternut squash
cabbage


Fruit

Mash or blend soft ripe fruits to a suitable texture for your baby, or give them as finger foods. Harder fruits will need to be cooked to soften them. Wash and remove any pips, stones and hard skin. Fruit includes:
bananas
blueberries
kiwi
oranges
apples
raspberries
mango
nectarines
pears
strawberries
pineapple
papaya
melon
peach
plums


Starchy foods

These can be cooked, where necessary, and mashed or blended to a suitable texture for your baby or offered as finger foods. Cereals can be mixed with breast milk or first infant formula – or with pasteurised whole (full-fat) cows' milk (or goats' or sheep's milk) if your baby is over 6 months old. Starchy foods include:
potato
sweet potato
rice
baby rice
pasta
porridge
oats
oatmeal
cornmeal
maize
millet
quinoa
toast
bread
chapatti
pitta bread


Protein foods

This food group includes meat, fish, eggs, beans and pulses and is suitable from around 6 months.
As well as giving your baby protein, these foods contain other useful nutrients, such as iron and zinc, which are important for babies.
Eggs produced under the British Lion Code of Practice (stamped with the red lion) are considered the very low risk for salmonella, and safe for babies and toddlers to eat raw or partially cooked. Protein foods include:
chicken
turkey
beef
lamb
pork
fish (no bones)
egg
lentils
beans
tofu
pulses, such as chickpeas


Dairy

Pasteurized dairy foods such as pasteurized full-fat yogurt and cheese are suitable foods for your baby from around 6 months.
Full-fat, unsweetened or plain yogurts are a good choice because they don’t contain added sugars. Whole pasteurized (full-fat) cows' milk, or goats' or sheep's milk, can be used in cooking or mixed with food from around 6 months old, but not as a drink until your baby is 12 months.
Eggs produced under the British Lion Code of Practice (stamped with the red lion) are considered the very low risk for salmonella, and safe for babies and toddlers to eat raw or partially cooked. Read about the healthy way to eat eggs.


Smooth or lumpy?

To help your baby get used to different textures and tastes quickly, try moving on to mashed and finger foods (from purées or blended) as soon as they're ready. This helps them learn how to chew, move solid food around their mouth and swallow solid foods. Give your baby a spoon and let them try feeding themselves – you might need to stick a mat under the highchair though!
Babies take different amounts of time to get used to lumps, but it's an important skill they need to learn. Just keep offering them lumpy textures from around 6 to 7 months, and stay with them so you can be sure they are swallowing it safely.
Finger foods help get them used to different textures, they love picking bits of food up and feeding themselves – this is also good for developing their hand-eye coordination. 


What is baby-led weaning?

Baby-led weaning means offering your baby only finger foods and letting them feed themselves from the start (rather than spoon-feeding them puréed or mashed foods). You can offer a range of small, finger-sized pieces of food.
Some parents prefer baby-led weaning to spoon-feeding, while others combine a bit of both. There's no right or wrong way – the most important thing is that your baby eats a wide variety of food and gets all the nutrients they need.


Drinks?

During meal times, offer your baby sips of water from an open or free-flow cup. Using an open cup, or a free-flow cup without a valve will help your baby learn to sip and is better for your baby’s teeth.
If your baby is younger than 6 months, it’s important to sterilize the water by boiling it first and then letting it cool right down.
Sweet drinks like squash, fizzy drinks, milkshakes, and fruit juice can have lots of sugar, so avoid these to help prevent tooth decay – even baby and toddler drinks can be sugary.
Cows’ milk is not a suitable drink until your baby is 12 months old, but it can be used in cooking or mixed with food from 6 months of age.